Paolozzi: Mosaics to Maquettes

Author: John Bryden

In February 2016 I was tasked with digitising a large number of mosaic pieces which once comprised an Eduardo Paolozzi mural, previously installed in Tottenham Court Road Tube Station, London in 1984. The work of the Scottish artist was acquired by the University of Edinburgh Art Collection in October 2015 following its removal from the tube station arches by Transport for London.

The dissipate mural consisted of approximately 500 fragments spread over 42 boxes and 4 pallets. Dependent on what percentage of the original mural we had actually acquired, the initial long-term plan was to reconstruct the mural and install it within the university campus, giving it a new life. From the outset however, it became clear that piecing it all back together again would be challenging. We decided to attempt to digitally reconstruct the mural first to give a better idea of the potential for physical reconstruction. This would also help us establish what percentage of the whole mural was represented among the pallets and boxes….an unusual, but exciting, project to say the least!

On a technical level, I used a Hasselblad-H4 camera and professional, Bowens studio lights within my digitisation process. To begin with, I captured several mosaic fragments in one shot and then went on to crop, and edit, each piece individually before saving as a separate, new file. The tricky part came in ensuring that the scale of each fragment would be represented correctly with every image produced. I, therefore, set the camera at a distance from the mosaics that would represent a 1:1 ratio in scale, placing a ruler within each raw image capture in order to make minor adjustments at a later stage if necessary. The result meant that, when using the images in image processing software, the pieces would be of a relative size to one another. If the size of the fragments was incorrect then this would only cause problems further down the line when trying to complete this very large digital jigsaw puzzle. Further, the faces/upside of the mosaics had to be perpendicular to the focal plane of the camera and, collectively, the mosaics had to be of equal distance to focal plane. The same principles applied for the positioning of the ruler itself. This confirmed that perspectives would not be distorted and that the relative size of the mosaics would remain consistent throughout the project.

montage-mosaic

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The image management process for this project involved saving the final cropped images as both tiff and png files. Having cropped directly around the edges of each fragment (i.e. with no background around the mosaic itself), the png files would then allow the fragments to be arranged edge to edge where possible. This process was key regarding the next stage of the project.

The images of the mosaics were then transferred to Professor Bob Fisher of the University’s Informatics Department. This cross departmental work seems particularly fitting as Paolozzi had close ties to the Informatics department and this relationship is visible in the form of several Paolozzi sculptures dotted about the Informatics buildings. With the help one of his PhD students, Professor Fisher used image recognition software, that he had developed, to digitally piece back together the fragments so to reflect the original design of the mural as best as possible. Professor Fisher had access to original images of the Paolozzi Mural in situ at Tottenham Road Tube Station which served as a vital reference point. To give a simple analogy, these original images would act as the cover image you would see on the box of a jigsaw puzzle, with the images of the individual mosaic fragments representing the pieces inside the box.

Art Collections Curator, Neil Lebeter, and I produced a short video interview with Professor Bob Fisher and Phd student, Alex Davies, where they discuss their work process, the challenges, and uniqueness, of this particular project and the results they have found to date. It is an interesting watch!

https://vimeo.com/170003917

Since the making of this interview the project plans have developed in light of Bob and Alex’s findings. In August 2016 the University employed a Public Art Officer, Liv Laumenech. As well as caring for, and developing the public art collection, she also has the responsibility of figuring out what to do with the fragments. Given that a large portion of the arches are missing, to reconstruct the arches now seems an unlikely option. The next step that has been taken is to organise an interdisciplinary symposium in February 2017 that will bring together Paolozzi experts, conservators and mosaicists to brainstorm ideas for redisplay and use of the fragments with students. Until such time as a decision is made regarding their redisplay, the mosaics have been used in teaching and as part of visits by researchers and the general public to the art collection.

Having completed my side of the Paolozzi Mosaics Project, I have been lucky enough to get the opportunity to digitise a large number of Paolozzi maquettes which are also part of the University of Edinburgh Art Collection. The collection encompasses a wide range of weird and wonderful pieces. Among his maquettes we can see where he began developing his ideas for what became his piece, The Manuscript of Monte Cassino (also known as the ‘big foot’), situated outside St Mary’s RC Cathedral here in Edinburgh.

paolozzi-big-foot

Digitising the mosaic fragments involved a more consistent photographic approach in terms of camera positioning and lighting, whereas working with the maquettes has offered slightly more freedom in this regard. I have been lighting and positioning each maquette in a way that best exhibits the physical attributes of that particular object. Here are a number of the maquettes pictured below.

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We have also had Digital Heritage specialist Clara Molina Sanchez in the studio carrying out 3D work on one of the maquettes. This should render a high quality 3D visualisation of the object. Currently we are looking at ways of delivery such 3D images online. Here, Clara has kindly allowed us to show an interesting behind-the-scenes shot of her setup.

paolozzi-clara

John Bryden

Project Photographer

Digital Imaging Unit

University of Edinburgh

 


 

None Hath Refused:

Digitising the Protestation Returns at the Parliamentary Archives

Author: Simon Barnes, Digital Imaging Technician, Parliamentary Archives

We’re a digitisation team of two in the Parliamentary Archives and we’re responsible for delivering the Archives’ public copying service, digitisation project work and supporting exhibitions and outreach activities. We handle on-demand requests for copies of archives from the public and support exhibition and outreach activities by photographing records which are about to go out on loan. We also do photography for exhibition panels, publicity and our web resources and social media.

The digitisation project work we do is essential to the Parliamentary Archives’ aim to increase online access to our collections. The latest project we’ve been working on is the Protestation Returns. The Protestation Returns, dating from 1641-42, were ordered by the House of Commons and required all adult men to swear allegiance to the Protestant religion. The returns were organised by parish and are the closest we have to a seventeenth century census, significantly taking place at the start of a civil war that involved all levels of society and affected all countries in the British Isles and Ireland.

We work closely with our Collection Care colleagues who help prepare the documents by doing a condition check, unbinding the Returns from their files and flattening any folded documents. This really helps to speed up the process of digitisation and flags any which may need careful handling. Whilst the majority of the Returns are written on paper, a number are on parchment. In some cases individuals signed their own names on the Return, but more often an official wrote down the names and individuals made their mark. Some people refused to make the protestation, and this was duly noted, whilst widows (who became household head on the death of their husbands) also sometimes signed. So, each Parish produced a return in its own fashion and it created a somewhat varied collection of documents!

Our main challenge with this project was the highly variable dimensions and formats of the documents. Some Returns were completed on the back of the declaration, some were bound into booklets and some were recorded on thin lengthy strips – some are very large, while others are tiny! We established early on that we would not be able to optimise the photography of each item by setting column height, lens choice and ppi individually, it would be too lengthy a process. Furthermore, we weren’t able to set our Nikon D800 at one height and photograph everything with one setting as there was too much variation but we thought the Nikon would be quick as we could use live view to line-up the documents. We tested and developed three different settings which enabled us to digitise the majority of the collection but inevitably some documents required individual settings. Part way through the project we bought an IQ180 digital back and 55mm lens for our Phase camera and decided to switch as we could improve quality and productivity. With 80 megapixels we could set the camera at one height and capture all our documents at 600ppi (see a time-lapse of my colleague Tim at work).

As much of a challenge has been the ability, time and motivation (!) to quality assure all the images generated. We’ve followed a process of first QA, followed by any necessary reprocessing/reshoots, a second QA and then web conversion and watermarking. The images are then moved to the digital repository for permanent preservation. Low resolution jpegs are viewable via our online catalogue and the Archivists and our IT department have developed a prototype Map Search, which allows users to search for the Returns we hold by area. So, if you can trace your family tree back to the seventeenth century, and you have an idea where your relatives lived, you may be able to find them in the Protestation Returns.

We’re promoting the records and the digitisation project, via social media, blogging and are planning some outreach activities with regional archives. For the social media promotion, we’ve picked out interesting watermarks, useful dates, noted when women are listed (they weren’t required to be), where there are ‘recusants’ (refusals) and are highlighting some of the more interesting information and text we’ve discovered – some people were ‘not at home’ when they should have been making the protestation!

The photography is complete and the Returns are being ingested into the digital repository and made available through the map and online catalogue.

We’ve started on our next project focussing on Victorian MP and Parliamentary Estate photographer Benjamin Stone, which involves both digitising his historic photographs of the Palace of Westminster and its visitors and taking some of our own pictures of the rooms today, to compare and contrast how things have changed. We have also been visiting the roof of the Victoria Tower and took a time-lapse of the view, where we were lucky to catch a raincloud, and rainbow, passing over London.

Tim Banting Digitising the Protestation Returns Some volumes, the printed Protestation and an example of a return